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Patterned pasta

Daring Kitchen
July 2016

Hi everybody I am Dulcie from thetastetrail.com (and London, England). I am so excited to be hosting my first challenge! I have been developing all-natural rainbow pasta recipes for a couple of years now and want to challenge you all to make your own patterned pasta from scratch. I promise, it is not as complex as the end results would lead you to believe.

Please note, I am English so expect to see an abundance of ‘U’s and a near ban on ‘Z’s in what follows below.

Recipe Source: www.thetastetrail.com

You can find the challenge PDF here

Notes:

  • Pasta dough dries out very quickly, be sure to keep it covered with clingfilm / saran wrap when not in use.
  • The dough can be kept for a day in the fridge provided it is covered, if making a lot of colours I recommend preparing your dough the day before.
  • Pasta flour must be used, all-purpose / plain flour is not strong enough and will cause your pasta to fall apart.
  • It is easy for the liquids to breach the flour and escape when mixing ingredients on an open work surface. If this happens don’t panic, use a plastic scraper to pull the liquid back into the flour. You can always mix the ingredients together in a bowl if you prefer.
  • Unless aiming for ‘bacon chic’ do not make a two toned striped pasta with egg pasta / beetroot. Trust me.

Note: Your pasta can be any shape you wish, farfalle, penne, lasagna, ravioli, tortellini. If you’re vegan you could try substituting the egg.

Preparation time:
Dough = Approx 10 minutes to make each colour and then one hour for it to rest in the fridge.
Pasta making / shaping = 45 minutes – 2 hours depending on how many colours you’re working with.

Equipment required:

Rolling pin
Pasta machine: if you don’t own or have access to one you can use a rolling pin, although I do not recommend making more than two different coloured doughs without a pasta machine
A juicer: some of the colours require a juicer; if you don’t have one you could either buy the juice ready-made or boil the veg in water, blitz it with a food processor / stick blender / mash with a fork and strain it through a fine sieve or muslin. You should get the colour you want, however it is unlikely to be quite as strong.
A plastic scraper: keep this with you at all times, or a spatula without a handle.
I do not use a food processor to make my dough. If you have one and want to use it, it should work great. Just bear in mind that pasta dough is very firm and could potentially damage your machine unless you follow the manufacturers guidelines.
A fork
Clingfilm / Saran wrap
Sharp knife
Pinking shears optional

Stages:

1. Choose your base colour. I strongly recommend using a regular egg pasta dough as your base, although you can use any colour in the chart below with a tick next to ‘primary pasta’. Colours with ticks next to ‘accent colour’ only should not be used in large quantities and are not suitable for your base.

2. Choose your accent colour(s) from the chart below.

3. Proceed to ‘Recipe 1: Pasta Dough’ to make your dough.

4. Proceed to ‘Recipe 2: Striped Pasta’ for instructions on how to make striped pasta.

5. Proceed to ‘Recipe 3: Polka Dot Pasta’ for instructions on how to make polka dot pasta.

Colour Chart:

Recipe 1: Pasta Dough

Servings: Every 100g / 3.5oz / 3/4 cup of flour equals 1 serving

Ingredients

EGG PASTA (REGULAR PASTA COLOUR)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
2 medium eggs

BROCCOLI (LIGHT GREEN)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
7 tbsp broccoli juice (obtained by putting roughly 400g / 14oz of broccoli through your juicer)
1 medium egg

SPINACH (DARK GREEN)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
7 tbsp spinach juice (obtained by putting roughly 175g / 6oz of spinach through your juicer)
1 medium egg

RED CABBAGE (BLUE)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
7 tbsp red cabbage juice (obtained by putting roughly 400g / 14oz of red cabbage through your juicer) mixed with 1 tbsp of bicarbonate of soda
1 medium egg

BEETROOT (DARK RED / PURPLE)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
7 tbsp beetroot (obtained by putting roughly 110g / 3.8oz beetroot through your juicer)
1 medium egg

TOMATO (RED / ORANGE)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
3 tbsp tomato puree
1 medium egg

CARROT (ORANGE / YELLOW)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
7 tbsp carrot juice (obtained by putting roughly 250g / 9oz carrot through your juicer)
1 medium egg

YELLOW PEPPER (LIGHT YELLOW)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
5 tbsp yellow pepper juice (obtained by putting roughly 175g / 6oz yellow pepper through your juicer)
3 medium egg yolks

BLACK OLIVES (BROWN)

200g / 7oz / 1.5 cups plus 1 tbsp ‘00’ grade pasta flour
3 tbsp black olive juice (obtained by putting roughly 170g / 6oz black olives through your juicer
1 medium egg
1 medium egg yolk

Directions:

n.b. The ratio of dry to liquid ingredients required is variable depending on your particular brand of flour, how large your eggs are and the climate of where you live. Your dough should be smooth. If it has cracks and won’t come together add a little more of the liquids, conversely if it is overly sticky or loose then add a little more flour.

1. Tip your flour onto a work surface to make a mound and make a cavity in the centre with your hand or the back of a spoon and add the wet ingredients into the cavity.

2. Using a fork, whisk the liquids, gradually incorporating the wet into the dry. If the liquid breaches your flour fort, don’t panic, have a plastic scraper to hand and use it to drag the liquid back into the flour.

3. Knead the dough for approximately ten minutes until it is smooth.

4. Wrap the dough with cling film / saran wrap and refrigerate for a minimum of 30 minutes (but ideally one hour).

Recipe 2: Striped Pasta

Servings: Every 100g / 3.5oz / 3/4 cup of flour equals 1 serving

Ingredients

A minimum of two different coloured pasta doughs.

Directions:

n.b. If you don’t have a pasta machine then use a rolling pin to roll out to the thicknesses indicated below. Pasta dough is very firm to work with and you’ll need to use your full weight if doing it by hand.

It is easier if you work with your pasta dough in batches. I work with no more than half of each coloured dough at any one time. Be sure to keep your dough covered with clingfilm / saran wrap when not in use as it dries out very quickly.

1. Take your base colour dough, and on a lightly floured work surface with a rolling pin, roll it out to circa 0.5cm / 1/5” thickness and half the width of your pasta machine lasagna slot.

2. Roll through the lasagna slot on your pasta machine at the thickest setting twice. Fold both sides of the length into the center, lightly roll with your rolling pin then put through the pasta machine again at the same setting.

3. Decrease the thickness setting of your machine by one slot and put the dough through twice. Continue in this manner until your pasta is approximately 1.4mm / 1/16” thick (on my machine this is setting 5).

4. Cover it with clingfilm / saran wrap or a clean tea towel and put aside.

5. For each accent colour, take the dough and complete steps 1 - 3 above, then run it through the linguine cutter on your pasta machine. If doing this by hand, lightly flour the dough, roll into a tube lengthwise and slice into thin strips then unravel it immediately. Cover straight away with clingfilm / saran wrap or a clean tea towel and put aside.

6. Lay strips of your linguine over your base colour in whichever colour combination you like and trim off the excess. Press lightly with a rolling pin to secure in place.

7. Pass through the lasagna slot of your pasta machine at the setting closest to 1.4mm / 1/16" (on my machine setting 5).

8. Your dough is now ready to be shaped into whatever you wish. You can use it to make a lasagna, roll it up into penne or stuff it with your favourite fillings to make ravioli or tortellini. See below instructions for making cute little bow shaped farfalle

9. To make farfalle: With a sharp knife cut into rectangles, I use pinking shears to make a zig-zag edge along the widths but this is completely optional.


10. Pinch the centres together with your fingers and you have farfalle!

Recipe 3: Polka Dot Pasta

Servings: Every 100g / 3.5oz / 3/4 cup of flour equals 1 serving

Ingredients

A minimum of two different coloured pasta doughs.

Directions:

n.b. If you don’t have a pasta machine then use a rolling pin to roll out to the thicknesses indicated below. Pasta dough is very firm to work with and you’ll need to use your full weight if doing it by hand.

It is easier if you work with your pasta dough in batches. I work with no more than half of each coloured dough at any one time. Be sure to keep your dough covered with clingfilm / saran wrap when not in use as it dries out very quickly.

1. Take your base colour dough, and on a lightly floured work surface with a rolling pin, roll it out to circa 0.5cm / 1/5" thickness and half the width of your pasta machine lasagna slot.

2. Roll through the lasagna slot on your pasta machine at the thickest setting twice. Fold both sides of the length into the centre, lightly roll with your rolling pin then put through the pasta machine again at the same setting.

3. Decrease the thickness setting of your machine by one slot and put the dough through twice. Continue in this manner until your pasta is approximately 1.4mm / 1/16" thick (on my machine this is setting 5).

4. Cover it with clingfilm / saran wrap or a clean tea towel and put aside.

5. For each accent colour, take the dough and complete steps 1 - 3 above, then run it through the linguine cutter on your pasta machine. If doing this by hand, lightly flour the dough, roll into a tube lengthwise and slice into thin strips then unravel it immediately. Cover straight away with clingfilm / saran wrap or a clean tea towl and put aside.

6. Cut the linguine into little pieces and roll into balls.

7. Arrange your polka dots evenly on your lasagna sheet.

8. Place a piece of clingfilm / saran wrap over the lasagna and lightly roll with a rolling pin to secure the polka dots in place.

11. Pass through the lasagna slot of your pasta machine at the setting closest to 1.4mm / 1/16" (on my machine setting 5).

12. Your dough is now ready to be shaped into whatever you wish. You can use it to make a lasagna, roll it up into penne or stuff it with your favourite fillings to make ravioli or tortellini. See below instructions for making cute little bow shaped farfalle

13. To make farfalle: With a sharp knife cut into rectangles, I use pinking shears to make a zig-zag edge along the widths but this is completely optional.

14. Pinch the centres together with your fingers and you have farfalle!

Storage & Freezing Instructions / Tips:

Pasta can be stored for future use by laying it out on baking parchment and allowing it to dry completely. This method works well in cold England, it may not be suitable for more humid climates.

Disclaimer:

The Daring Kitchen and its members in no way suggest we are medical professionals and therefore are NOT responsible for any error in reporting of “alternate baking / cooking”. If you have issues with digesting gluten, then it is YOUR responsibility to research the ingredient before using it. If you have allergies, it is YOUR responsibility to make sure any ingredient in a recipe will not adversely affect you. If you are lactose intolerant, it is YOUR responsibility to make sure any ingredient in a recipe will not adversely affect you. If you are vegetarian or vegan, it is YOUR responsibility to make sure any ingredient in a recipe will not adversely affect you. The responsibility is YOURS regardless of what health issue you’re dealing with. Please consult your physician with any questions before using an ingredient you are not familiar with. Thank you! Smile

Dulcie
wildflourandthyme
User offline. Last seen 30 weeks 5 days ago. Offline
Joined: 02/01/2013

Big Hug This is wonderful. Although I missed the challenge, you have inspired me to make this pasta this week. I have seen these pastas sold in small packages in Tokyo but yours are much more interesting and I love the natural elements chart!